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Overview

Globalization brings the peoples of the world closer together. However, discrimination and other forms of intolerance continue to cause problems. In our increasingly multicultural society these issues can lead to exclusion and inequality, often along racial and ethnic lines.

This on-line program is a direct response to learning needs identified by a broad range of representatives from human services and justice agencies who recognize that racial inequity and negative stereotyping are significant social problems. In this six course certificate in Intercultural Relations, learners will examine diversity issues in a social context, explore critical differences in cross-cultural communication and identify the sources, causes, forms and manifestations of these issues in our society.

Entry Requirements

EAC149 is the suggested corequisite for most Liberal Studies courses.

Prerequisites

It is your responsibility to ensure that program requirements and course prerequisites as outlined are met. Prerequisites are included for your academic protection. Knowledge of the prerequisite material is assumed by your instructor and instruction will proceed accordingly. Students lacking prerequisites not only jeopardize their own ability to succeed but present unnecessary interruption. If you lack appropriate prerequisites (or Transfer Credit for the prerequisite course) you may be asked to withdraw or transfer to a more appropriate course with the risk of academic/financial penalty.


Filter Classes: In Class     Online     Correspondence     Hybrid     Availability   


Curriculum

Certificate Requirements

CAN104
First Nations People
Availability
 

Corequisite(s):

EAC149

Students will increase knowledge and awareness of important issues in the Aboriginal cultures of Canada. The legal status of Aboriginal people will be explored along with Aboriginal rights and self-determination. Other critical issues relating to land claims, justice and social services will be studied.




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CAN105
Contemporary Canadian Social Problems
Availability
 

Corequisite(s):

EAC149

In this course, current social science paradigms and theories will be used as a framework for analysis of contemporary social issues relevant to vocations in police services. Topics such as crime, violence, abuse, social stratification, ageism, and racism will be included. The course focus will be on how individual behaviours collectively create social issues.




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CAN107
Racism and Discrimination
Availability
 

Corequisite(s):

EAC149

Racism and discrimination will be defined and discussed in the context of Canadian multicultural society. Learners will identify types of discrimination and racism and discuss the connection between discrimination and society. Sociological factors, such as the media, that may contribute to biases and prejudice will also be analyzed. The objectives of this course are to sensitize students to intolerance that is based on race or ethnicity and to consider ways to handle these issues in a pluralistic society.




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CAN109
Intercultural Communications
Availability
 

Corequisite(s):

EAC149

Students will define culture and be introduced to intercultural communication theories and issues. Learners will identify how these theories apply to our daily lives and how they can be used to develop respect for differences between cultures. The main objective of this course is to enhance the students' ability to communicate comfortably with people from different origins. As part of the course, students will communicate with people from other cultures electronically as well as in person. This course will be of interest to individuals working in health, education, human services, and business who have regular interactions with people of foreign descent.




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CAN132
Issues in Diversity
Availability
 

Corequisite(s):

EAC149

Students critically identify and examine issues in diversity. Specifically, topics pertaining to inequality in various social settings, including but not limited to: race, gender, ethnicity, class and sexual orientation. Incorporating social/legal explanations of diversity, students develop a clear understanding of the groups affected and the possible strategies of community empowerment.




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SOC600
Introduction to Sociology
Availability
 

Corequisite(s):

EAC149

An introduction to contemporary sociological thinking and to theories of social behaviour including deviance and social control. Using sociological concepts and perspectives, students will study and survey areas related to Canadian society and culture, including social inequalities, social interactions, and collective behaviour. The course introduces students to theories of social problems, research methodologies and issues that have influenced sociological thinking in the areas of deviance and social control. Using various perspectives and concepts, students will analyze and survey issues relating to acts of aggression and violence, poverty, the elderly, family and various other contemporary social issues. Analytical frameworks for social issues and problems will be investigated.




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Program Outcomes

The graduate has reliably demonstrated the ability to:

  1. Increase knowledge and awareness of important issues in the Aboriginal cultures of Canada. The legal status of Aboriginal people will be explored along with Aboriginal rights and self-determination. Other critical issues relating to land claims, justice and social services will be studied.
  2. Analyze current social science paradigms and theories as a framework of contemporary social issues relevant to vocations in police services. Topics such as crime, violence, abuse, social stratification, ageism, and racism will be included. The course focus will be on how individual behaviours collectively create social issues.
  3. Define Racism and discrimination and discuss in the context of Canadian multicultural society. Learners will identify types of discrimination and racism and discuss the connection between discrimination and society. Sociological factors, such as the media, that may contribute to biases and prejudice will also be analyzed. The objectives of this course are to sensitize students to intolerance that is based on race or ethnicity and to consider ways to handle these issues in a pluralistic society.
  4. Define culture and be introduced to intercultural communication theories and issues. Learners will identify how these theories apply to our daily lives and how they can be used to develop respect for differences between cultures. The main objective of this course is to enhance the students' ability to communicate comfortably with people from different origins. As part of the course, students will communicate with people from other cultures electronically as well as in person. This course will be of interest to individuals working in health, education, human services, and business who have regular interactions with people of foreign descent.
  5. Critically identify and examine issues in diversity. Specifically, topics pertaining to inequality in various social settings, including but not limited to: race, gender, ethnicity, class and sexual orientation. Incorporating social/legal explanations of diversity, students develop a clear understanding of the groups affected and the possible strategies of community empowerment.
  6. Study of people's lives, their relationship to society as a whole, and how people are affected by the society in which they live. The concepts, theories and methods of the discipline will be introduced and discussed with particular emphasis on the dynamics of Canadian society and Canadian social problems.

Credit for Prior Learning

Prior Learning Assessment

Earn college credits for what you already know!
Prior Learning Assessment is a method of assessing and recognizing learning that is equal to college level learning, but has been gained outside a traditional classroom (through work experience, volunteering, outside study, etc.). If you can prove that the knowledge you have gained meets the outcomes of a Seneca course, then credit will be awarded.

How does the PLA process work?
Prior Learning is demonstrated through a "challenge" process. The process measures learning through a variety of methods which may include tests, portfolio assessment, interviews, demonstrations, essays, and work samples. The method used will be determined in consultation with a Program Coordinator.
For more information and to determine if you are eligible for PLA, please call the Program Coordinator.

The process may take from 6 to 8 weeks.

Note: Not all courses can be challenged. For more information go to PLA website or contact your Program Coordinator.

Transfer Credit (Advanced Standing)

Many students who enter Seneca College will have earned academic credits in post-secondary educational institutions which they may be able to apply toward completion of a Seneca College program.

Requests for Transfer Credit must be for a specific course and must be accompanied by an official transcript and course outline. A minimum grade of "C" (60 percent) is generally required for a course to be considered for Transfer Credit.

Download a Transfer Credit Request form. An official copy of your transcript and applicable detailed course outlines should be attached and submitted. Please note it may take 4 to 6 weeks for a Transfer Credit decision.

More Information

Please visit the Degree and Credit Transfer Office.

Graduation/Convocation

When you meet all program requirements and become eligible for a certificate, diploma, or degree, you must inform the Registrar by completing a Graduation Application form and paying the graduation and alumni fee. Certificates, diplomas, and applied degrees are issued twice a year in the Fall (October) and Spring (June).

For further information including deadlines and fees, please visit the  Convocation website or contact the Convocation Office at 416-491-5050 ext. 77461.

Minimum Performance for Graduation

Students will only be eligible to graduate with a Seneca College certificate or diploma if they have maintained an overall good standing in their current program of study. Students in degree programs will be eligible to graduate when they have obtained an average of C (2.5 GPA) in courses in the main field of study, and an average of C (2.0 GPA) in all other courses.

Learning Modes

In-class:

The course will be taught in a traditional classroom instructional mode. A variety of methods will be used to aid the student in acquiring the required knowledge to meet the outcome of this course.

Online:

The course will be delivered via the internet. This involves the use of the online materials and/or a text, possible group discussions and consultation with your instructor via email. Students will be responsible for completing all online activities and participating in group discussion and working through textbook questions, as required.

Hybrid:

Delivery is mixed, blending face-to-face instructions and facilitating out of classroom experiences and/or online instructions.

Correspondence:

Correspondence is a self-paced method of learning, supported with email access to an instructor. As a student, you have up to twenty weeks to complete each course, giving you an additional six weeks over the classroom format. Courses typically start the first week of the month. Faculty are available to assist you by fax or email. You can discuss a plan of study with your faculty contact to ensure an appropriate assignment and test schedule. In some cases this may be included in your study guide. You schedule yourself into a Test Centre or appoint a proctor in order to write required tests.

Program Contacts

Jamara Romero
Program Assistant
Jamara.Romero@senecacollege.ca
416-491-5050 ext.22513


Klaus Grober
Academic Program Manager
Klaus.Grober@senecacollege.ca
416-491-5050 ext.22682