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Liberal Studies Degree-level Credits

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Courses

Lower Level

INS100
Introduction to the Social Sciences I
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This course provides a foundation for further study in the social sciences by introducing students to their basic subject matter and theory. It is designed for students in the Bachelor of Interdisciplinary Studies Degree Program, forming a basis for upper level courses in any of the relevant social sciences. It will also serve as a Liberal Studies course suitable to provide an introduction to social science topics for the broader body of Seneca College students. The course is unified via a focus on a central theme or themes of relevance to all the social sciences, such as power and human nature. Through lectures, readings, discussions, and assignments, this course will offer a comprehensive interdisciplinary introduction to these central issues, integrating diverse social science approaches to the topic. The course emphasizes the development of critical thinking and writing skills, facilitates the practical application of student learning, and promotes the integration of social science insights into students' broader understanding of themselves and their world.




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INS200
Introduction to the Social Sciences II
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This course provides a foundation for further study in the social sciences by introducing students to their basic subject matter and theory, focusing in particular on political science and economics. It is designed for students in the Bachelor of Interdisciplinary Studies, forming a basis for upper level social science courses. It will also serve as a Liberal Studies course suitable to provide an introduction to social science topics for the broader body of Seneca College students. The course is unified via a focus on central themes relevant to all the social sciences, such as power and human nature. Through lectures, readings, discussions, and assignments both online and in-class, this course offers a comprehensive interdisciplinary introduction to these central issues, integrating diverse social science approaches to the topic. The course emphasizes the development of critical thinking and writing skills, facilitates the practical application of student learning, and promotes the integration of social science insights into students' broader understanding of themselves and their world. Introduction to the Social Sciences 1 is not a prerequisite.




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INT100
Quantitative Reasoning
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This is a one-semester mathematics course designed to introduce some important topics in mathematics. It is intended to provide students with the prerequisites for a further course in Statistics. The course will engage students in meaningful mathematics through discovery, problem solving and discussions.




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INT202
Statistics
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This course provides an introduction to basic statistical concepts and techniques that are common to various disciplines. Statistical methods of data collection, analysis, presentation and interpretation for making generalizations, projections and decisions will be introduced. Both descriptive and inferential techniques will be explored.




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INW100
World Civilizations: Bronze Age to the 15th Century
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Students in INW100 will develop a broad understanding of world civilizations that have contributed to our sense of world history. Students will explore the development and interactions of various societies over time by examining world historical processes and using a range of disciplinary approaches (i.e. history, philosophy, sociology, art history, etc.). In INW100 students will discover how this complex tapestry of narratives has culminated in our modern understanding of the world as a "global village".




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INW200
World Civilizations: 16th Century to Modern Times
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Students in INW200 will develop a broad understanding of world civilizations that have contributed to our sense of world history. Students will explore the development and interactions of various societies over time by examining world historical processes and using a range of disciplinary approaches (i.e. history, philosophy, sociology, art history, etc.). In INW200 students will discover how this complex tapestry of narratives has culminated in our modern understanding of the world as a "global village".




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INX100
Introduction to the Natural Sciences
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This survey course is intended to give students a broad understanding of those sub-disciplines that comprise the natural sciences and to provide students with an understanding of the history, philosophy and social contributions of science. It will introduce students to current issues of particular concern to both science and society.




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LSO115
Spanish Language and Culture
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This course provides an introduction to the cultural and language traditions within the Spanish-speaking world from an interdisciplinary perspective. The course focuses on the interaction between language and the cultures that underlie it, paying equal attention to the Spanish language (studied both experientially and theoretically) and the distinct societies that speak it. Consequently, to study the Spanish language as a cultural product provides the student a more meaningful way to gain cultural and linguistic proficiency.




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LSO120
Introduction to Sociology
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Prerequisite(s):

ENG106 or equivalent.

Sociology is the scientific study of society. This course is a general introduction to the concepts, theories, and major perspectives of sociology. An examination of research studies drawn from Canadian society and beyond our borders will highlight the significance of utilizing a sociological perspective or sociological imagination.




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LSO121
Introduction to Political Science
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Prerequisite(s):

ENG106 or equivalent.

The world of politics is often difficult to understand without some theoretical training. Yet, it is vital, particularly for citizens of a democracy, to understand how politics works. For all its complexity and frequent inelegance, politics is what allows humans to manage their differences, to share their resources, to protect their rights, and to change their governments. Political science methodologies, approaches and theories allow students to learn how the state, the structures of government and the political process impact their daily lives. Find out why consumer advocate Ralph Nader said that you should "turn on to politics before politics turn on you". Discover the value of being a "good citizen". Now more than ever, the citizens, especially, those from socially-marginalized sectors of the population need to develop a deep understanding of politics and ideologies and how they are relevant to securing or advancing their material interests.
And find out why the late Brazilian educator Paulo Freire had this to say about political participation, leaders and the citizenry, "Leaders who do not act dialogically, but insist on imposing their decisions, do not organize the people--they manipulate them. They do not liberate, nor are they liberated: they oppress." Pedagogy of the Oppressed




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LSO165
Social Consciousness: Equity and Social Justice
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This course examines contemporary issues and key concepts of equity/inequity and social justice in a global context. It provides students with the opportunity to critically consider and evaluate social responsibility and participation in local, national and international communities. The course unpacks and seeks a deeper understanding of the following topics/issues: social analysis, media literacy, cultural values, social exclusion, power and privilege, gender, class and social action.




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LSO172
Introduction to Art History
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Prerequisite(s):

ENG106

Focusing primarily on Western European art, this course is an introduction to art history. Moving chronologically from the pre-modern era to post-modernity, students will engage with the ways in which works of art act as windows into the historical contexts that inform them. This course will examine how artworks at once build on and transform classical definitions of visual culture, including also the artistic styles and forces that animate them. Students will be encouraged to consider what constitutes "Art" and how art deeply affects human lives, experiences and ways of being in the world.




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LSO220
Selected Themes in Canadian History
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Prerequisite(s):

ENG106 or equivalent.

This course introduces students to the complexities, variations and background of selected issues in Canadian History. Using the methodology of social history, learners will analyze a variety of contemporary issues from an historical perspective. This will include an examination of Canadian Government and the Constitution, of Aboriginal Peoples, of Industrialization and Urbanization, of Religious Life and Culture and of Women in Canada.




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LSO230
Modern Social and Political Thought
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Prerequisite(s):

ENG106 or equivalent.

This course introduces students to the seminal ideas of major western thinkers of the modern period. This course provides an historical and integrated inter-disciplinary perspective on the development of those ideas that have shaped the thought of our own time.
The twenty-first century begins with the promise of new ideas, new technologies as well as the challenges associated with these apparent changes. This course is designed to facilitate the development of students' capacity to think both critically and historically about their own time, the past and social movements. It will introduce students to the ideas that have shaped our age and our ways of thinking thereby placing their own thinking within a larger context and increasing the clarity of that thought.
In addition to the professor responsible for and the primary lecturer of the course, students will be active participants through class discussions, presentations, and debates.




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LSO245
Media and the Information Age
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Prerequisite(s):

ENG106 or its equivalent

The average person in Canada spends about 230 minutes per day watching TV and 200 minutes per day on the Internet. That's about 325 eight-hour days, a full-time job! We spend another 70 minutes per day with other media, including newspapers, magazines, and traditional radio. That's more than 3,000 hours per year of media use, more time than we spend on anything else, including working or sleeping. This consumption of information sustains our economy, and most of the economic activity in North America now involves producing, processing or distributing information including the output of the mass media, Internet, telecommunications and computer industries. The goal of this course is to prepare students to thrive in today's increasingly integrated communications and information environment.




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LSO256
Film Wars: The Warner Brothers vs. The MGM Lion
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Prerequisite(s):

ENG106 or equivalent.

Any art form is a product of the society and/or culture in which it is created, and as such, reflects and/or challenges the prevailing values and beliefs. "Film Wars" takes a cinematic look at the social and cultural history of North America from the silent film era to today. By examining the films of two major rival Hollywood studios, Warner Brothers and Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, we will discover that the stories they chose to bring to the screen and the stylistic and cinematic techniques and devices that they used, were dramatically different. By looking at several of the classic films from each of these studios, we will develop a deeper understanding and appreciation of both film style and cultural history.




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LSO260
Principles of Psychology
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Prerequisite(s):

ENG106 or equivalent.

As we move through the world and interact with those around us, we all play the role of "psychologist", trying to understand why we and others do what we do, feel what we feel, and think what we think. This course is designed to introduce you to the scientific study of human behaviour and mental processes. By understanding how psychological research is conducted, by examining the evidence that has been accumulated in the field, and by using critical thinking and analysis, it is hoped that the assumptions and intuition you have gained through your own experience with the world will be re-examined and re-evaluated in a new and interesting light. A variety of areas within this broad and fascinating field will be examined. These may include learning, memory, social psychology, developmental psychology, stress and health, personality, and abnormal psychology.




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LSO290
Queer Studies
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As an introduction to queer studies, this course will explore the history of sexuality, in particular shifting concepts of male-male desire, as well as related issues pertaining to queer sexuality and identity through the medium of literature, theory, and film.




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LSP240
Micro Economics - Theory & Practice
Availability
 

Prerequisite(s):

ENG106 or equivalent

This course explains how prices are determined and resources allocated under different market forms, and diverse economic environments. It focuses on actual economic problems, and develops the theoretical structure to analyze these problems. Careful consideration is given to "soft" factors such as culture, economical legislation and trade regulation, which influence decision-making.




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Upper Level

INC300
Social Media & Professional Identity: The Web of Influence
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Every day, millions of people share their opinions with a global audience via Tweets, #s, blogs, wikis, videos, likes, tags, text messages and online comments. Digital spaces and mobile technologies allow us to be connected to our personal and professional networks and communities 24/7. In what ways does this hyper-connectivity impact the ways in which people regard their place in the world and define themselves?
In this course we will analyse the social, ethical, political and cultural ramifications of societies that are increasingly mobile and digital. The impact of new genres and forms of expression on our identities will be explored as we actively participate in online networks and create materials for social media.




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INH301
Gender and Sexuality in World History
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Historically, women and men have been expected to behave in gender appropriate ways. Yet, what is considered appropriately feminine or masculine is not fixed; instead, these ideals are socially constructed and depend on time and place and are influenced by other categories of identity like status or class, and race and ethnicity. In this course, we will examine the construction of gender ideals and consider the impact of these ideals on aspects of life ranging from the most private (sex, sexual identity, sexual regulation, family formation) to the most public (work, citizenship and political power, war, conquest). Covering the classical period to the modern period and including societies in the Americas, Africa, Asia and Europe, this course will take a comparative approach and will analyze the impact of cultural contact on gender ideals. Whether accepted, adapted or rejected, gender expectations have affected every aspect of men's and women's lives in world history.




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INS301
Introduction to the Cognitive Sciences
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Prerequisite(s):

ENG106 or equivalent.

Although philosophers have considered the nature of the mind for millennia, a new interdisciplinary approach developed in the 20th century: cognitive science. After millennia of study, the problems remained the same: Is the mind different from the brain? What is consciousness? How can I tell if other people have minds? Is it possible to create an artificial intelligence? Are humans truly rational? Cognitive science includes approaches from computer science, linguistics, anthropology, philosophy and psychology in an attempt to answer these ancient questions. Students will be introduced to central themes in cognitive science by reading key articles and excerpts from books from important cognitive scientists across the various disciplines.




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INS302
Ethics for the 21st Century: Theory and Practice
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This course examines some of the most influential ethical theories, emphasizing practical application in real world situations. Starting with timeless issues affecting persons throughout history, the main focus will be on current ethical problems unimaginable to the founders of western ethical thought along with future scenarios at the boundaries of our own imaginations. Students will explore how to make ethical choices in our complex, technologically mediated, and rapidly changing world.




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INX300
Astronomy
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This course introduces students to the science of Astronomy. They will study the planets, stars, galaxies, the structure of the observable universe and our place in it. Students will understand the Earth's motions, the reason for seasons, tides, and eclipses. They will learn about modern views of the solar system, the nature of stars and their evolution. Students will gain understanding of galaxies and the history of the observable universe. As a result, they will develop a better appreciation of the beauty of the cosmos and the scientific quest to understand it.




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LSO312
The Graphic Novel
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Prerequisite(s):

ENG106 or equivalent or permission of the coordinator

The graphic novel emerged in the last quarter of the twentieth century as a complex narrational medium, powerfully combining telling and showing. From its antecedents in comic strip and comic book, the graphic novel evolved, through a sequence of thematically, narratively, and semiotically challenging comics, into a full-fledged narrative art form. This course surveys a range of graphic novels, both mainstream and independent. The emphasis, however, will be on the independent graphic novel. Secondary readings in history and criticism will help students understand better the context from which the graphic novel emerged, and to grasp more firmly their visual and textual aesthetics.




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LSO375
Introduction to World Drama
Availability
 

Prerequisite(s):

Admission into degree program.

The course provides an introduction for students to a variety of dramatic works from around the world. The course will present the art and history of theatre as it has evolved from pre-historic times to our post-modern world. We will examine the literature of theatre - structure, form, genre and style and how a play text is transformed into theatre.




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LSO403
Group Dynamics
Availability
 

Prerequisite(s):

ENG106 or one lower-level liberal studies (LSO) or Critical Thinking course.

This course offers a comprehensive analysis of theory and research related to group dynamics. Student explore social processes in groups and their impact on individual behaviour and are introduced to the following group elements: norms, roles, coherence and dissonance, group think, validation, types of groups and membership, referencing, group symptoms, leadership styles. The student will practice leading and participating in groups where observation and recording skills will be stressed.




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LSO430
Gaming and Gender: The Digital Divide
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Prerequisite(s):

ENG106 or equivalent.

This degree elective breadth course combines the study of digital games and psychological, sociological, cultural, aesthetic and literary influences characteristic in online gaming. Students explore parallels between modern societal values related to gender and those occurring in the gaming world. Through experiential learning opportunities involving gameplay, students examine a variety of elements and how they converge or diverge from socio-cultural norms.




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LSO440
Globalization in the 20th Century and Beyond
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Corequisite(s):

ENG106 or equivalent

This course focuses on the examination of contemporary patterns of globalization in all its forms. The 20th century has experienced great social upheaval and transformation. We fought two world wars, saw the rise and fall of the Soviet communist regime, and witnessed the formal dismantling of European empires. We experienced dramatic technological change and the ascendancy of corporate capitalism as the primary global economic model. We have also witnessed unprecedented economic disparities and ecological hazards from air, water and soil pollution to global climate change. The 21st century promises to see these trends accelerate and intensify.




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LSO445
The Image Age
Availability
 

Corequisite(s):

LSO245 or Equivalent

We negotiate the world through visual culture, whether we are sighted or have low vision that requires adaptive or assistive technologies, and whether we live in urban spaces saturated with surfaces covered in advertisements and signs or remote places in which we depend on our screens to connect with "the world". The term "visual culture" encompasses many media forms ranging from fine art to film and television to advertising to visual data in fields such as the sciences, law, and medicine. In this class we will examine what it means to study these diverse forms together. We will also discuss how we attach meaning to these visuals and how they impact our culture and society.




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LSO460
Social Psychology
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Prerequisite(s):

LSO260 or equivalent or permission of the coordinator

It is universally recognized in art, literature, history and individual experience that human beings are social beings. Who we are, how we think, how we feel, and how we behave are all subject to the influence of the situation in which we find ourselves. Social psychology is the science that attempts to examine, describe, and explain the impact of social situations on individuals and on groups. This course will examine topics within the field such as how we see ourselves and others in a social context, how attitudes are formed and changed, and the power of social situations to influence our behaviour. Building on the knowledge the learner has of psychological research methodology, this course aims to improve the student's understanding of how psychologists study social influence and interaction. Both group and individual processes will be examined in depth to encourage critical analysis of a variety of theoretical viewpoints, and to develop the learner's ability to investigate and report on current perspectives in social psychology.




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LSO478
Movies and Meaning
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Prerequisite(s):

ENG 106 or one lower-level liberal studies (LSO) or Critical Thinking course.

This course explains how the elements of film structure create meaning. Film is a complex collaborative art form with its own structural and syntactical patterns. Audiences' subliminal and conscious absorption of meaning depends on elements of film structure. This subject will provide an introduction to how movies work. It will present examples to help students grasp each production element and get a sense of film's history. Students will follow a structured approach to understanding how meaning is relayed through light, sound, and motion and the language of visual media products. To "see" and "read" a film, television production, or music video with critical awareness requires learning how film technology creates and shapes meaning.




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LSO802
Criminal Psychology: Psychopaths & Serial Killers
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Are psychopaths born or made? This course provides students both with an analysis of the development of criminals and in particular that of psychopaths and serial killers. The biological, developmental, learning and situational factors that contribute to criminal antisocial behaviour will be explored in detail. Since there is sound research on psychopaths, a particular focus will be placed on psychopaths. The diagnosis of psychopathic personality, connections between psychopathic and normal personalities, neuroscience findings and research on emotion and thought processes in psychopaths will be examined. Case studies will be examined to bring the research to life.




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LSP340
Macroeconomics - Theory & Practice
Availability
 

Prerequisite(s):

LSP240 - Micro Economics

This course concentrates initially on the definition and measurement of the principal aggregate economic indicators such as Gross Domestic Product, unemployment and inflation. It then explains how the level of economic activity, prices, interest rates and the value of the Canadian dollar are determined, under different internal and external environments, and alternative government policies. A basic open-economy model is constructed, and the impact of alternative fiscal, monetary and trade policies on macro economic variables are analyzed and appraised.




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LSP500
Ethics and Social Responsibility
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Prerequisite(s):

ENG106 or equivalent.

Ethics or moral philosophy is the philosophical exploration and consideration of the values and principles we use to make moral judgments. Thus, answers to the fundamental questions of ethics provide guidelines for how we should lead our lives. This course will introduce students to the major ethical theories and consider the practical implications and applications of these theories for conduct in the business world.




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Program Contacts

Colleen Shea
Program Assistant
Colleen.Shea@senecacollege.ca
416.491.5050 x22685


Melanie Rubens
Program Coordinator
Melanie.Rubens@senecacollege.ca
416-491-5050 ext.22589