CUL493 - What in the World is Going On?

Outline info
Semester
School
Last revision date 2017-06-29 11:53:44.981
Last review date 2017-06-29 11:53:44.982


Subject Title
What in the World is Going On?

Subject Description
News stories confront us with people, places, issues, and crises from around the world. An understanding of background issues helps us make informed judgements. This course focuses on the main news stories of the day and looks for your critical interpretations.

Credit Status
One General Education Credit in the Arts and Humanities category.

Learning Outcomes
Upon successful completion of this subject the student will be able to:

1. Critically analyze the mainstream news media (MSM)
 
2. Identify the essential worldview of mainstream journalism
 
3. Explain how worldview bias has skewed the coverage of important issues such as global warming, racism, homelessness
 
4. Understand and explain the reasons why the MSM often fails to provide fair and balanced coverage
 
5. Utilize a range of alternative resources from weblogs, to websites, to books, videos, radio, and television which provide critical checks and balances
 
6. Consume news skeptically, realizing that it all comes with a spin

Essential Employability Skills
Communicate clearly, concisely and correctly in the written, spoken and visual form that fulfils the purpose and meets the needs of the audience.

Respond to written, spoken, or visual messages in a manner that ensures effective communication.

Locate, select, organize, and document information using appropriate technology and information systems.

Analyze, evaluate, and apply relevant information from a variety of sources.

Manage the use of time and other resources to complete projects.

Take responsibility for one's own actions, decisions, and consequences.

Cheating and Plagiarism
Each student should be aware of the College's policy regarding Cheating and Plagiarism. Seneca's Academic Policy will be strictly enforced.

To support academic honesty at Seneca College, all work submitted by students may be reviewed for authenticity and originality, utilizing software tools and third party services. Please visit the Academic Honesty site on http://library.senecacollege.ca for further information regarding cheating and plagiarism policies and procedures.

Discrimination/Harassment
All students and employees have the right to study and work in an environment that is free from discrimination and/or harassment. Language or activities that defeat this objective violate the College Policy on Discrimination/Harassment and shall not be tolerated. Information and assistance are available from the Student Conduct Office at student.conduct@senecacollege.ca.

Accommodation for Students with Disabilities
The College will provide reasonable accommodation to students with disabilities in order to promote academic success. If you require accommodation, contact the Counselling and Disabilities Services Office at ext. 22900 to initiate the process for documenting, assessing and implementing your individual accommodation needs.

Prerequisite(s)
 

Topic Outline

  • News as a Represention of Reality
  • News Judgment and Perspective
  • Truth and Accuracy 
  • Objectivity and Balance
  • Media Bias and Spin
  • 24-hour News
  • Media Ownership
  • The Internet and Mainstream News Media
  • Social Media and Citizen Journalists
  • Online News, Wikileaks, edward Snowden
  • Censorship in the Digital Age
  • Ethical Dilemmas: Privacy, Racism, Mistakes  

Mode of Instruction
Online: All class work is completed in a fully online environment. Students do not attend any classes on campus; however, the final exam must be written in-person at the Test Centre.

* Students interested in pursuing  online courses must have strong time management skills and regular access to a home or office computer with an Internet connection and web access.

Prescribed Texts

W. James Potter, Media Literacy 8th edition. Sage Publications. Thousand Oaks, Calif. ISBN 9781483379326
 

Reference Material
Students are referred to the following web site for the Seneca College Library MLA Style Guide and Guide to Integrating Quotations (MLA Style):
http://seneca.libguides.com/mla

Promotion Policy

Grading Policy
A+ 90%  to  100%
A 80%  to  89%
B+ 75%  to  79%
B 70%  to  74%
C+ 65%  to  69%
C 60%  to  64%
D+ 55%  to  59%
D 50%  to  54%
F 0%    to  49% (Not a Pass)
OR
EXC Excellent
SAT Satisfactory
UNSAT Unsatisfactory

For further information, see a copy of the Academic Policy, available online (http://www.senecacollege.ca/academic-policy) or at Seneca's Registrar's Offices.



Modes of Evaluation

To be successful in this course, you must complete all course work as specified and achieve an overall grade of 50% or higher. For further information on evaluation and academic standing, see a copy of the Academic Policy available at Seneca registration offices.

Term work:
All term work assignments must be completed prior to the time of the final exam or last class.  Students must contact faculty in advance of the assignment due date to discuss the possibility of an extension.  Late assignments may be subject to the awarding of a penalty resulting in a lower grade assigned. 
Make-up opportunities for assignments must also be made in advance of the scheduled due date.  If an assignment is missed due to class absence, official documentation must be submitted to the faculty member on or before the next scheduled class. Make-up opportunities may not apply to all graded assignments.
 

Assignments (2) 25%
Discussions (4) 20%
Major Paper 20%
Final Exam (In Person paper-format) 35%


Student Success:
 
Online
Please access the course every week (or more) and keep up with assigned readings. Make sure you participate in online discussions and hand in any assigned work on time. Following these suggestions will increase your chances of success.



Approved by: Fiona Bain-greenwood