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Overview

This program is designed primarily for those employed in a rehabilitation setting or related occupations, those with academic training in psychology, or those needing to meet academic requirements of certification. The content enhances the skills of practitioners working with persons who have physical, emotional and developmental challenges. Program perspective focuses on home, vocational and agency environments.

Graduates may work in public sector agencies, private rehabilitation organizations, insurance settings and others.

This program presents a wide theory base with practical application to the vocational rehabilitation field. It is based on a multi-discipline approach to meet the needs of employees new to the environment and of those experienced in the field.

Specific helpful attitudes and values are encouraged and reinforced in order to enhance the practitioner's performance and well being.

Entry Requirements

Current employment or experience as a volunteer in the vocational rehabilitation field is strongly recommended.

Prerequisites

It is your responsibility to ensure that program requirements and course prerequisites as outlined are met. Prerequisites are included for your academic protection. Knowledge of the prerequisite material is assumed by your instructor and instruction will proceed accordingly. Students lacking prerequisites not only jeopardize their own ability to succeed but present unnecessary interruption. If you lack appropriate prerequisites (or Transfer Credit for the prerequisite course) you may be asked to withdraw or transfer to a more appropriate course with the risk of academic/financial penalty.


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Curriculum

Basic Background Courses

SRC931
Normal Growth and Devel. Across the Life Span
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The theoretical framework of this course enables students to develop a recognition and understanding of normal physical, emotional, social, spiritual and cognitive development from conception to death. Students examine the normal flow of experience; the biological and emotional stresses which impinge on human beings at various stages of their development; the demands imposed by these stresses; the range of normal reactions, and possible solutions.




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SRC932
Medical and Functional Aspects of Disability
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This course familiarizes students with particular body systems and provides a basic understanding of a variety of disabilities and abnormalities. Students will learn about disabling conditions in a life span perspective including causes, prevention, adaptive devices and expected improvement. The major focus is on chronic disorders which result in long-term issues and adjustments for clients, their families and society. The medical, functional, psychosocial, environmental and vocational implications of the disorders are examined.




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SRC933
Mental Health Issues
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This course is designed to familiarize students with a theoretical and practical understanding of mental health issues and disorders. The diagnosis and treatment of these disorders will be explored as well as return to work strategies. Students will also learn about the implications of ethical behaviour and diversity as they relate to mental health.




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Rehabilitation and Skills Courses

SRC934
Interviewing and Counseling
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This course provides an overview of the basic communication principles and techniques which are integral to developing and refining interviewing and counseling skills. This course will also provide an introduction to group dynamics and counseling techniques with families. Students have an opportunity to practice interviewing skills and analyze their own performance in order to foster confidence and skill development. The issues of diversity and ethics will be discussed with respect to individual and family counseling.




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SRC935
Introduction to Rehabilitation, History and Values
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This course provides a general introduction to the field of rehabilitation, placing emphasis on its historical and philosophical underpinnings. Students explore societal values and trends and rehabilitation practices, policies and principles within the context of past and present political climates. The phases of the rehabilitation process are introduced and the role for advocacy and consumerism are also discussed.




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SRC936
Community Resources
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This course provides students with an overview of community resources available to individuals with disabilities and teaches skills for the effective evaluation and use of these resources. It is a practical course designed to be of use to students in their daily work as Rehabilitation Counselors.




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SRC937
Case Management
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Prerequisite(s):

SRC935, SRC939

This course examines the elements of case and caseload management principles and practices, including case recording, documentation, and forensic rehabilitation.




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SRC938
Health and Welfare Policy
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This course offers a general overview of Social Policies and practices in Canada as well as the processes involved in the development of laws which impact on rehabilitation. Historical background, cross-cultural data and the role of the rehabilitation professional as an advocate are also discussed. Canadian and American legislation are compared.




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SRC939
Vocational Rehabilitation Strategies
Availability
 

Prerequisite(s):

SRC935

This course examines the elements of vocational rehabilitation, focusing on the concepts of employment and career development, job exploration, career planning, job placement, and follow-up. Students learn about the importance of consultation with employers regarding marketing, disability prevention and job accommodation.




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SRC940
Ethics and Professionalism
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This course is designed to introduce students to ethical standards and guidelines in rehabilitation. Students will learn about the role of the Rehabilitation Professional and examine areas such as professional conduct, scope of practice and accountability. Students learn how to effectively and professionally approach ethical dilemmas and issues of diversity in conflict resolution. The importance of advocacy and quality assurance are also discussed.




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SRC941
Assessment Approaches
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This course discusses various theories of assessment in the field of rehabilitation. Students are introduced to assessment terminology and the administration, application and interpretation of evaluation tools. Students will learn how to use assessment results in the development of vocational and independent living plans. Cultural issues and ethics in testing are also reviewed.




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Graduates of the certificate can apply to the College of Vocational Rehabilitation Professionals for the Certified Rehabilitation Advisor (CVA) credential. If the graduate of the certificate holds a recognized College Diploma, Degree or Master's Degree, the CVS, CVP or MCVP can be awarded upon application.

Credit for Prior Learning

Prior Learning Assessment

Earn college credits for what you already know!
Prior Learning Assessment is a method of assessing and recognizing learning that is equal to college level learning, but has been gained outside a traditional classroom (through work experience, volunteering, outside study, etc.). If you can prove that the knowledge you have gained meets the outcomes of a Seneca course, then credit will be awarded.

How does the PLA process work?
Prior Learning is demonstrated through a "challenge" process. The process measures learning through a variety of methods which may include tests, portfolio assessment, interviews, demonstrations, essays, and work samples. The method used will be determined in consultation with a Program Coordinator.
For more information and to determine if you are eligible for PLA, please call the Program Coordinator.

The process may take from 6 to 8 weeks.

Note: Not all courses can be challenged. For more information go to PLA website or contact your Program Coordinator.

Transfer Credit (Advanced Standing)

Many students who enter Seneca College will have earned academic credits in post-secondary educational institutions which they may be able to apply toward completion of a Seneca College program.

Requests for Transfer Credit must be for a specific course and must be accompanied by an official transcript and course outline. A minimum grade of "C" (60 percent) is generally required for a course to be considered for Transfer Credit.

Download a Transfer Credit Request form. An official copy of your transcript and applicable detailed course outlines should be attached and submitted. Please note it may take 4 to 6 weeks for a Transfer Credit decision.

More Information

Please visit the Degree and Credit Transfer Office.

Correspondence Studies

Students take individual courses by correspondence through The Centre for Flexible Learning. In this format, the student works at an individualized pace through the use and aid of a tutor and self-directed study materials. Students are provided up to 20 weeks to complete the course requirements, though they can discuss fast tracking with their tutor.

All courses are available through The Centre for Flexible Learning. For further information on study by correspondence, call 416-491-5050, ext. 24140 or email dl@senecacollege.ca.

There are two intakes per semester with a registration deadline of the 20th of the month prior to the start date of the intake.

Training at Work
Seneca will conduct courses for companies on their premises. Please contact the Program Coordinator at 416-491-5050, ext. 24019 to explore this option.
 

Graduation

If you meet all program requirements and become eligible for a Certificate, Diploma or Degree you must inform the Registration Office by completing a Graduate Application form and paying the fee. Forms are available at the Registration office and online.

Certificates and diplomas are issued twice a year: Fall (October) and Spring (June). Request to Graduate forms must be received no later than July 31 (for Fall Convocation), November 30 or March 31 (for Spring Convocation).

Minimum Performance for Graduation

Students will only be eligible to graduate with a Seneca College certificate or diploma if they have maintained an overall good standing in their current program of study. Students in degree programs will be eligible to graduate when they have obtained an average of C (2.5 GPA) in courses in the main field of study, and an average of C (2.0 GPA) in all other courses.

Program Contacts

Maria Graziosi
Program Assistant
Maria.Graziosi@senecacollege.ca
416-491-5050 ext.22512


Barbara Pimenoff
Program Coordinator
Barbara.Pimenoff@senecacollege.ca
416-491-5050 ext.24019