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Courses

INH301
Gender and Sexuality in World History
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Historically, women and men have been expected to behave in gender appropriate ways. Yet, what is considered appropriately feminine or masculine is not fixed; instead, these ideals are socially constructed and depend on time and place and are influenced by other categories of identity like status or class, and race and ethnicity. In this course, we will examine the construction of gender ideals and consider the impact of these ideals on aspects of life ranging from the most private (sex, sexual identity, sexual regulation, family formation) to the most public (work, citizenship and political power, war, conquest). Covering the classical period to the modern period and including societies in the Americas, Africa, Asia and Europe, this course will take a comparative approach and will analyze the impact of cultural contact on gender ideals. Whether accepted, adapted or rejected, gender expectations have affected every aspect of men's and women's lives in world history.




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LSO312
The Graphic Novel
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Prerequisite(s):

ENG106 or equivalent or permission of the coordinator

The graphic novel emerged in the last quarter of the twentieth century as a complex narrational medium, powerfully combining telling and showing. From its antecedents in comic strip and comic book, the graphic novel evolved, through a sequence of thematically, narratively, and semiotically challenging comics, into a full-fledged narrative art form. This course surveys a range of graphic novels, both mainstream and independent. The emphasis, however, will be on the independent graphic novel. Secondary readings in history and criticism will help students understand better the context from which the graphic novel emerged, and to grasp more firmly their visual and textual aesthetics.




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LSO375
Introduction to World Drama
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Prerequisite(s):

Admission into degree program.

The course provides an introduction for students to a variety of dramatic works from around the world. The course will present the art and history of theatre as it has evolved from pre-historic times to our post-modern world. We will examine the literature of theatre - structure, form, genre and style and how a play text is transformed into theatre.




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LSO445
The Image Age
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Corequisite(s):

LSO245 or Equivalent

We negotiate the world through visual culture, whether we are sighted or have low vision that requires adaptive or assistive technologies, and whether we live in urban spaces saturated with surfaces covered in advertisements and signs or remote places in which we depend on our screens to connect with "the world". The term "visual culture" encompasses many media forms ranging from fine art to film and television to advertising to visual data in fields such as the sciences, law, and medicine. In this class we will examine what it means to study these diverse forms together. We will also discuss how we attach meaning to these visuals and how they impact our culture and society.




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LSO478
Movies and Meaning
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Prerequisite(s):

ENG 106 or one lower-level liberal studies (LSO) or Critical Thinking course.

This course explains how the elements of film structure create meaning. Film is a complex collaborative art form with its own structural and syntactical patterns. Audiences' subliminal and conscious absorption of meaning depends on elements of film structure. This subject will provide an introduction to how movies work. It will present examples to help students grasp each production element and get a sense of film's history. Students will follow a structured approach to understanding how meaning is relayed through light, sound, and motion and the language of visual media products. To "see" and "read" a film, television production, or music video with critical awareness requires learning how film technology creates and shapes meaning.




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Program Contacts

Colleen Shea
Program Assistant
Colleen.Shea@senecacollege.ca
416-491-5050 ext.22685


Melanie Rubens
Program Coordinator
Melanie.Rubens@senecacollege.ca
416-491-5050 ext.22589